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Resources for Recognizing and Challenging Racism: Understanding and Confronting Systemic Racism

Welcome

“Honest and earnest criticism from those whose interests are most nearly touched,- criticism of writers by readers, of government by those governed, of leaders by those led, - this is the soul of democracy and the safeguard of modern society”

W.E.B. Du Bois, The Souls of Black Folks

Listed above are Ted Talks that help us understand the history and impact of racism. Click on the photograph to see the full collection of Ted Talks on understanding racism in America. Click through this box to see highlighted talks by prominent speakers. "From passionate pleas for reform to poetic turns of phrase, these talks take an honest look at the everyday realities of Black Americans and illuminate the way forward." 

The difference between being "not racist" and antiracist.

Click on the above photo to view Ibram X. Kendi's Ted Talk. 

"There is no such thing as being "not racist," says author and historian Ibram X. Kendi. In this vital conversation, he defines the transformative concept of antiracism to help us more clearly recognize, takes responsibility for, and reject prejudices in our public policies, workplaces, and personal beliefs. Learn how you can actively use this awareness to uproot injustice and inequality in the world -- and replace it with love.' (This virtual interview, hosted by TED's current affairs curator Whitney Pennington Rodgers and speaker development curator Cloe Shasha, was recorded June 9, 2020.)" 

How we can make racism a solvable problem and improve policing.

To view Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff's Ted Talk, click on the above photo. 

"When we define racism as behaviors instead of feelings, we can measure it -- and transform it from an impossible problem into a solvable one, says justice scientist Dr. Phillip Atiba Goff. In an actionable talk, he shares his work at the Center for Policing Equity. This organization helps police departments diagnose and track racial gaps in policing to eliminate them. Learn more about their data-driven approach -- and how you can get involved with the work that still needs to be done. (This ambitious plan is part of The Audacious Project, TED's initiative to inspire and fund global change.)"

We need to talk about an injustice.

To view Bryan Stevenson's Ted Talk, click on the above photo.  

"In an engaging and personal talk -- with cameo appearances from his grandmother and Rosa Parks -- human rights lawyer Bryan Stevenson shares some hard truths about America's justice system, starting with a massive imbalance along racial lines: a third of the country's black male population has been incarcerated at some point in their lives. These issues, which are wrapped up in America's unexamined history, are rarely talked about with this level of candor, insight and persuasiveness."

Racism has a cost for everyone.

To view Heather C. McGhee's Ted Talk, click on the above photo. 

Racism makes our economy worse -- and not just in ways that harm people of color, says public policy expert Heather C. McGhee. From her research and travels across the US, McGhee shares startling insights into how racism fuels bad policymaking and drains our economic potential -- and offers a crucial rethink on what we can do to create a more prosperous nation for all. "Our fates are linked," she says. "It costs us so much to remain divided."

The little problem I had renting a house.

 To view, James A. White's Ted Talk click on the above photo.

Fifty-three years ago, James A. White Sr. joined the US Air Force. But as an African American man, he had to go to shocking lengths to find a place for his young family to live nearby. He tells this powerful story about the lived experience of "everyday racism" -- and how it echoes today in the way he's had to teach his grandchildren to interact with police.

 To view Dr. David Ikard's Ted Talk, click on the above photo.

Black history taught in US schools is often watered-down, riddled with inaccuracies and stripped of its context and rich, full-bodied historical figures. Equipped with the real story of Rosa Parks, professor David Ikard highlights how making the realities of race more benign and digestible harms us all -- and emphasizes the power and importance of historical accuracy.

Resources on the History and Experiences of BIPOC

The Encyclopedia of African-American Culture and History covers all aspects of the African-American experience from 1619 to the present day. Using biographies, historical essays, and thematic pieces, many written by foremost scholars, it addresses a wide array of subjects in over 2,300 articles to define in one source the cultural roots, participation in American life, and current condition of the African-American community.  The first edition is available in print in the library (Ref. E 185 .E54 1996) and the second edition is available online as part of the Gale Virtual Reference Library.

The African-American Years: Chronologies of American History and Experience discusses the history of African Americans from pre-colonial times to the present. Includes memoirs, letters, family histories, newspapers, oral histories, and city directories, providing historical evidence to help understand and interpret past events.

To locate books and videos, search for the subject African Americans in the library catalog; you can find additional titles under subject headings beginning with African American.

Please click through this box for a reading list from the voices of people of color confronting racism.

This book is available as an e-book through Pepperdine Libraries. Click on the above photo to access the book. Please click to the next slide for a brief description of this item. 

Continued: Freedom is a constant struggle : Ferguson, Palestine, and the foundations of a movement

"In these newly collected essays, interviews, and speeches, world-renowned activist and scholar Angela Y. Davis illuminates the connections between struggles against state violence and oppression throughout history and around the world. Reflecting on the importance of black feminism, intersectionality, and prison abolitionism for today's struggles, Davis discusses the legacies of previous liberation struggles, from the Black Freedom Movement to the South African anti-Apartheid movement. She highlights connections and analyzes today's struggles against state terror, from Ferguson to Palestine. Facing a world of outrageous injustice, Davis challenges us to imagine and build the movement for human liberation. And in doing so, she reminds us that freedom is a constant struggle."

This book is available as an e-book through Pepperdine Libraries. Click on the above photo to access the book. Please click to the next slide for a brief description of this item. 

Continued: The Fire Next Time

"A national bestseller when it first appeared in 1963, The Fire Next Time galvanized the nation and gave passionate voice to the emerging civil rights movement. At once a powerful evocation of James Baldwin's early life in Harlem and a disturbing examination of the consequences of racial injustice, the book is an intensely personal and provocative document. It consists of two "letters," written on the occasion of the centennial of the Emancipation Proclamation, that exhorts Americans, both black and white, to attack the terrible legacy of racism. Described by The New York Times Book Review as "sermon, ultimatum, confession, deposition, testament, and chronicle ... all presented in searing, brilliant prose," The Fire Next Time stands as a classic of our literature."

This book is available as an e-book through Pepperdine Libraries. Click on the above photo to access the book. "A collection of essays on family, race, violence, celebrity, music, writing, and other topics"

This item is available as a print book at Pepperdine Libraries. Please click on the above photo for its availability. "Written by Alex Haley from conversations with the leader over a period of two years before his death." 

This book is available as an e-book through Pepperdine Libraries. Click on the above photo to access the book. Please click to the next slide for a brief description of this item. 

Continued: Why I'm No Longer Talking to White People About Race

Award-winning journalist Reni Eddo-Lodge was frustrated with the way that discussions of race and racism are so often led by those blind to it, by those willfully ignorant of its legacy. Her response, Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race, has transformed the conversation both in Britain and around the world. Examining everything from eradicated black history to the political purpose of white dominance, from whitewashed feminism to the inextricable link between class and race, Eddo-Lodge offers a timely and essential new framework for how to see, acknowledge, and counter racism. Including a new afterword by the author, this is a searing, illuminating, absolutely necessary exploration of what it is to be a person of color in Britain today, and an essential handbook for anyone looking to understand how structural racism works.

This item is available as a print book at Pepperdine Libraries. Please click on the above photo for its availability. Please click to the next slide for a brief description of this item. 

Continued: This Bridge Called My Back

"This Bridge Called My Back" is a testimony to women of color feminism as it emerged in the last quarter of the twentieth century. Through personal essays, criticism, interviews, testimonials, poetry, and visual art, the collection explores, as coeditor Cherrie Moraga writes, the complex confluence of identities race, class, gender, and sexuality systemic to women of color oppression and liberation."

This book is available as an e-book through Pepperdine Libraries. Click on the above photo to access the book. Please click to the next slide for a brief description of this item. 

Continued: Microaggressions in everyday life : race, gender, and sexual orientation

"Written by bestselling author Derald Wing Sue, Microaggressions in Everyday Life: Race, Gender, and Sexual Orientation is a first-of-its-kind guide on the subject of microaggressions. This book insightfully looks at the various kinds of microaggressions and their psychological effects on both perpetrators and their targets. Thought-provoking and timely, Dr. Sue suggests realistic and optimistic guidance for combating-and ending-microaggressions in our society"

This book is available as an e-book through Pepperdine Libraries. Click on the above photo to access the book. Please click to the next slide for a brief description of this item. 

Continued: So you want to talk about race

In So You Want to Talk About Race, Ijeoma Oluo guides readers of all races through subjects ranging from intersectionality and affirmative action to "model minorities" in an attempt to make the seemingly impossible possible: honest conversations about race and racism, and how they infect almost every aspect of American life.