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Anti-Racism and Pedagogy: Home

Resources for developing anti-racist pedagogical strategies

Welcome

"Anti-racist pedagogy is not about simply incorporating racial content into courses, curriculum, and discipline.  It is also about how one teaches, even in courses where race is not the subject matter."(Kishimoto, 2018, p.540)

Articles

Books

Pedagogy of the Oppressed

First published in Portuguese in 1968, Pedagogy of the Oppressed was translated and published in English in 1970. The methodology of the late Paulo Freire has helped to empower countless impoverished and illiterate people throughout the world. Freire's work has taken on especial urgency in the United States and Western Europe, where the creation of a permanent underclass among the underprivileged and minorities in cities and urban centers is increasingly accepted as the norm. With a substantive new introduction on Freire's life and the remarkable impact of this book by writer and Freire confidant and authority Donaldo Macedo, this anniversary edition of Pedagogy of the Oppressed will inspire a new generation of educators, students, and general readers for years to come.

Transforming the Academy: faculty perspectives on diversity and pedagogy

In recent decades, American universities have begun to tout the "diversity" of their faculty and student bodies. But what kinds of diversity are being championed in their admissions and hiring practices, and what kinds are being neglected? Is diversity enough to solve the structural inequalities that plague our universities? And how might we articulate the value of diversity in the first place? Transforming the Academy begins to answer these questions by bringing together a mix of faculty--male and female, cisgender and queer, immigrant and native-born, tenured and contingent, white, black, multiracial, and other--from public and private universities across the United States. Whether describing contentious power dynamics within their classrooms or recounting protests that occurred on their campuses, the book's contributors offer bracingly honest inside accounts of both the conflicts and the learning experiences that can emerge from being a representative of diversity. The collection's authors are united by their commitment to an ideal of the American university as an inclusive and transformative space, one where students from all backgrounds can simultaneously feel intellectually challenged and personally supported. Yet Transforming the Academy also offers a wide range of perspectives on how to best achieve these goals, a diversity of opinion that is sure to inspire lively debate.

Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence: understanding and facilitating difficult dialogues on race

Most people avoid discussion of race-related topics because of the strong emotions and feelings of discomfort that inevitably accompany such conversations.  Race Talk and the Conspiracy of Silence puts an end to that dynamic by sharing strategies for smoothing conversations about race in a productive manner. A guide for facilitating and participating in difficult dialogues about race, author Derald Wing Sue - an internationally recognized expert on multiculturalism, diversity, and microaggressions - explores the characteristics, dynamics, and meaning behind discussions about race as well as the hidden "ground rules" that inhibit honest and productive dialogue. Through emotional and visceral examples, this book explains why conversations revolving around racial issues are so difficult, and provides guidelines, techniques, and advice for navigating and leading honest and forthright discussions. Discussions about race do not have to result in disastrous consequences, and can in fact be highly beneficial to all parties involved. It's important that people have the ability to converse openly and honestly with their students, colleagues, children, and neighbors, and Race Talk provides the path for achieving this goal.

International Handbook of Cultural Studies in Education

This handbook examines key issues and debates, theories and practices in the context of culture studies in education, bringing together a multiplicity of voices in a collective and converging manner that ask critical questions about the meanings of diverse forms of Cultural Studies in Education. Examining case studies of individuals, groups, collectives and social institutions, this handbook focuses on Cultural Studies in Education as theorized and analyzed from a heterogeneity of vantage points and its practical role and impact in challenging, rupturing, subverting, and changing dominant socio-economic, political, and cultural forces and structures that reproduce normalizing power relations that work to maintain injustice and inequity in various educational contexts.

Teaching Race: how to help students unmask and challenge racism

A real-world how-to manual for talking about race in the classroom Educators and activists frequently call for the need to address the lingering presence of racism in higher education. Yet few books offer specific suggestions and advice on how to introduce race to students who believe we live in a post-racial world where racism is no longer a real issue. In Teaching Race the authors offer practical tools and techniques for teaching and discussing racial issues at predominately White institutions of higher education. current events highlight the dynamics surrounding race and racism on campus and the world beyond, this book provides teachers with essential training to facilitate productive discussion and raise racial awareness in the classroom. A variety of teaching and learning experts provide insights, tips, and guidance on running classroom discussions on race.

Teaching with Tension: race, resistance, and reality in the classroom

Teaching with Tension is a collection of seventeen original essays that address the extent to which attitudes about race, impacted by the current political moment in the United States, have produced pedagogical challenges for professors in the humanities. Drawing together personal reflection, pedagogical strategies, and critical theory, Teaching with Tension offers concrete examinations that will foster student learning. The essays are organized into three thematic sections: "Teaching in Times and Places of Struggle" examines the dynamics of teaching race during the current moment, marked by neoconservative politics and twenty-first century freedom struggles. "Teaching in the Neoliberal University" focuses on how pressures and exigencies of neoliberalism (such as individualism, customer-service models of education, and online courses) impact the way in which race is taught and conceptualized in college classes. The final section, "Teaching How to Read Race and (Counter)Narratives," homes in on direct strategies used to historicize race in classrooms comprised of millennials who grapple with race neutral ideologies.

Teaching about Race and Racism in the College Classroom: notes from a white professor

In this book, Cyndi Kernahan argues that you can be honest and unflinching in your teaching about racism while also providing a compassionate learning environment that allows for mistakes and avoids shaming students. She provides evidence for how learning works with respect to race and racism along with practical teaching strategies rooted in that evidence to help instructors feel more confident. She also differentiates between how white students and students of color are likely to experience the classroom, helping instructors provide a more effective learning experience for all students.

Antiracist Writing Assessment Ecologies

To explain how and why antiracist work in the writing classroom is vital to literacy learning, Inoue incorporates ideas about the white racial habitus that informs dominant discourses in the academy and other contexts. Inoue helps teachers understand the unintended racism that often occurs when teachers do not have explicit antiracist agendas in their assessments. Drawing on his own teaching and classroom inquiry, Inoue offers a heuristic for developing and critiquing writing assessment ecologies that explores seven elements of any writing assessment ecology: power, parts, purposes, people, processes, products, and places.

Not Light, but Fire: How to Lead Meaningful Race Conversations in the Classroom

Inspired by Frederick Douglass's abolitionist call to action, "it is not light that is needed, but fire" Matthew Kay has spent his career learning how to lead students through the most difficult race conversations. Kay not only makes the case that classrooms are one of the best places to have those conversations, but he also offers a method for getting them right, providing candid guidance on: How to recognize the difference between meaningful and inconsequential race conversations. How to build conversational "safe spaces," not merely declare them. How to infuse race conversations with urgency and purpose. How to thrive in the face of unexpected challenges. With the right blend of reflection and humility, Kay asserts, teachers can make school one of the best venues for young people to discuss race.

Teaching to Transgress: education as the practice of freedom

"After reading Teaching to TransgressI am once again struck by bell hooks's never-ending, unquiet intellectual energy, an energy that makes her radical and loving." -- Paulo Freire In Teaching to Transgress,bell hooks--writer, teacher, and insurgent black intellectual--writes about a new kind of education, education as the practice of freedom. Teaching students to "transgress" against racial, sexual, and class boundaries in order to achieve the gift of freedom is, for hooks, the teacher's most important goal. bell hooks speaks to the heart of education today: how can we rethink teaching practices in the age of multiculturalism? What do we do about teachers who do not want to teach, and students who do not want to learn? How should we deal with racism and sexism in the classroom? Full of passion and politics, Teaching to Transgress combines a practical knowledge of the classroom with a deeply felt connection to the world of emotions and feelings.

Inclusive Teaching

In this volume, the authors focus on the importance of inclusive teaching and the role faculty can play in helping students achieve, though not necessarily in the same way. To teach with a focus on inclusion means to believe that every person has the ability to learn. It means that most individuals want to learn, to improve their ability to better understand the world in which they live, and to be able to navigate their pathways of life. This volume includes the following topics: * best practices for teaching students with social, economic, gender, or ethnic differences * adjustments to the teaching and learning process to focus on inclusion * strategies for teaching that help learners connect what they know with the information presented * environments that maximize learners' academic and social growth. The premise of inclusive teaching works to demonstrate that all people can and do learn. Educators and administrators can incorporate the techniques of inclusive learning and help learners retain more information. This is the 140th volume of the quarterly Jossey-Bass higher education series New Directions for Teaching and Learning. It offers a comprehensive range of ideas and techniques for improving college teaching based on the experience of seasoned instructors and the latest findings of educational and psychological researchers.

Performing Antiracist Pedagogy in Rhetoric, Writing, and Communication

Frankie Condon and Vershawn Ashanti Young seek to help create openings to address race and racism not only in course readings and class discussion in writing, rhetoric, and communication courses but also in wider public settings. The contributors to this collection, drawn from a wide range of disciplines, urge readers to renew their commitment to intelligently and publicly deliberate race and to counteract the effects of racism. The book is both theoretically rigorous and practical, providing readers with insightful analyses of race and racism and useful classroom suggestions and examples.

The Race Controversy in American Education

In this unique two-volume work, expert scholars and practitioners examine race and racism in public education, tackling controversial educational issues such as the school-to-prison pipeline, charter schools, school funding, affirmative action, and racialized curricula. This work is built on the premise that recent efforts to advance color-blind, race-neutral educational policies and reforms have not only proven ineffective in achieving racial equity and equality of educational opportunities and outcomes in America's public schools but also exacerbated existing inequalities. That point is made through a collection of essays that examine the consequences of racial inequality on the school experience and success of students of color and other historically marginalized populations. Addressing K-12 education and higher education in historically black as well as predominantly white institutions, the work probes the impact of race and racism on education policies and reforms to determine the role schools, school processes, and school structures play in the perpetuation of racial inequality in American education. Each volume validates the impact of race on teaching and learning and exposes the ways in which racism manifests itself in U.S. schools. In addition, practical recommendations are presented that may be used to confront and eradicate racism in education.

Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion: strategies for facilitating conversations on race

Facilitating conversations about race often involves tension, as both the facilitators and participants bring emotional experiences and their deeply held values and beliefs into the room. Diversity, Equity and Inclusion: Strategies for Facilitating Conversations on Race guides facilitators through a process of becoming comfortable with the discomfort in leading conversations about racism, privilege and power. This book walks you through the important steps to create a foundation where participants feel brave enough to take risks and share their stories and perspectives. It guides you through strategies for engaging participants in courageous conversations with one another in ways that don't shame and blame people into understanding. This book is a useful tool for individuals, organizations and college professors who are interested in learning techniques for guiding their audience through dialogue whereby they become open to listening to one another for understanding rather than holding on to old beliefs and maintaining a posture of defense. Readers will learn how the dynamics of race show up in cross cultural spaces, including the unique challenges faced by facilitators of color and white facilitators. In addition, we explore how to identify and counter white privilege in the dialogue between participants. Both novice and experienced facilitators will learn helpful strategies for leading conversation that result in people recognizing their role as change agents in ending oppression.

Learning to Speak, Learning to Listen

Over the past three decades, colleges and universities have committed to encouraging, embracing, and supporting diversity as a core principle of their mission. But how are goals for achieving and maintaining diversity actually met? What is the role of students in this mission? When a university is committed to diversity, what is campus culture like? In Learning to Speak, Learning to Listen, Susan E. Chase portrays how undergraduates at a predominantly white urban institution, which she calls "City University" (a pseudonym), learn to speak and listen to each other across social differences. Chase interviewed a wide range of students and conducted content analyses of the student newspaper, student government minutes, curricula, and website to document diversity debates at this university. Amid various controversies, she identifies a defining moment in the campus culture: a protest organized by students of color to highlight the university's failure to live up to its diversity commitments. Some white students dismissed the protest, some were hostile to it, and some fully engaged their peers of color. 

The Elephant in the Classroom: race and writing

While many works have been written about African American students and composition, they tend to examine the students themselves: their language, attitudes toward education, and successes and difficulties with writing. This collection examines the social construct of the classroom itself. African American students confront a complex situation in the composition classroom. Both their learning and their writing are made more difficult because in many instances, the instructor is White; while the instructor may have thought with some sensitivity about the problems African American students might face, he/she may not have thought critically about either his/her own "Whiteness" and its possible impact on students or about the university as a "White" institution. When the language, the rhetoric, and the culture of some students is neither accepted nor understood by the instructor, and some traits are still stigmatised rather than seen as strengths, learning is made more difficult and in some cases impossible. In examining the classroom as a social construct, chapters consider the academy's traditions and expectations for writing and the teaching of writing; the role of Standard American English as a language that is typically privileged; the importance of understanding student writers; and ultimately, strategies and approaches that are more likely to help both instructors and students create a classroom community. The university expects that students will come to it and change; however, to educate students respectfully and successfully, both the academy and individual instructors must be willing to listen and change with their students.

Everyday Antiracism: Getting Real About Race in School

Which acts by educators are racist' and which are 'antiracist'? How can an educator constructively discuss complex issues of race with students and colleagues? In Everyday Antiracism leading educators deal with the most challenging questions about race in school, offering invaluable and effective advice.'

Teaching/Learning Anti-Racism: a developmental approach

The autors have been teaching anti-racism to adults for over 20 years. Based on their real classroom experience, Teaching/Learning Anti-Racism offers us a guide to the development of anti-racist identity, awareness, and behavior. By integrating methodology and course content descriptions with student writings and analyses of students' growth, the book highlights the interaction between teaching and learning. Organized chronologically from the first to the last class, the text describes how each session contributed to the students' fascinating journey from pro-racist consciousness to active anti-racism. The authors, one White and one African American, also share their experiences--the successes, the failures, the difficulties, and, most important, what they learned from their students. Teaching/Learning Anti-Racism provides both a "how-to" and a conceptual framework to help teachers and trainers adapt anti-racism education for their programs.

The Art of Effective Facilitation: reflections from social justice educators

How can I apply learning and social justice theory to become a better facilitator? Should I prepare differently for workshops around specific identities? This book is intended for the increasing number of faculty and student affairs administrators - at whatever their level of experience -- who are being are asked to become social justice educators to prepare students to live successfully within, and contribute to, an equitable multicultural society. It will enable facilitators to create programs that go beyond superficial discussion of the issues to fundamentally address the structural and cultural causes of inequity, and provide students with the knowledge and skills to work for a more just society. Beyond theory, design, techniques and advice on practice, the book concludes with a section on supporting student social action. The authors illuminate the art and complexity of facilitation, describe multiple approaches, and discuss the necessary and ongoing reflection process. What sets this book apart is how the authors illustrate these practices through personal narratives of challenges encountered, and by admitting to their struggles and mistakes. They emphasize the need to prepare by taking into account such considerations as the developmental readiness of the participants, and the particular issues and historical context of the campus, before designing and facilitating a social justice training or selecting specific exercises.

Race, Equity, and the Learning Environment: the global relevance of critical and inclusive pedagogies in higher education

At a time of impending demographic shifts, faculty and administrators in higher education around the world are becoming aware of the need to address the systemic practices and barriers that contribute to inequitable educational outcomes of racially and ethnically diverse students. Focusing on the higher education learning environment, this volume illuminates the global relevance of critical and inclusive pedagogies (CIP), and demonstrates how their application can transform the teaching and learning process and promote more equitable educational outcomes among all students, but especially racially minoritized students. The examples in this book illustrate the importance of recognizing the detrimental impact of dominant ideologies, of evaluating who is being included in and excluded from the learning process, and paying attention to when teaching fails to consider students' varying social, psychological, physical and/or emotional needs. This edited volume brings CIP into the realm of comparative education by gathering scholars from across academic disciplines and countries to explore how these pedagogies not only promote deep learning among students, but also better equip instructors to attend to the needs of diverse students by prioritizing their intellectual and social development; creating identity affirming learning environments that foster high expectations; recognizing the value of the cultural and national differences that learners bring to the educational experience; and engaging the "whole" student in the teaching and learning process.

Challenges of Multicultural Education: teaching and taking diversity courses

The voices of college students and teachers vividly enlighten readers about the real-world challenges of multicultural education. Courses on diversity abound in American universities today. But open classroom discussion of racial and gender differences can evoke discomfort as much as new understandings. Negotiating these courses takes a toll on both faculty and students as classrooms become filled with emotion. Based on student and teacher experience in a range of American colleges and universities, this book shows how to meet these challenges and create a truly open and beneficial environment. The authors demonstrate pedagogical strategies and new approaches. A vital resource for teachers, students, college administrators, and university libraries. Contents: Introduction. Dialogue on Diversity Teaching. From Silence and Resistance to Tongues Untied. The Racial Experiment. Starting with a Story and Sharing the Discussion Leading. Irritating, Supporting & Representing. Identity Matters in Class. What Lies Beneath. Conclusion.

Pedagogies of Difference: rethinking education for social chang

Peter Pericles Trifonas has assembled internationally acclaimed theorists and educational practitioners whose essays explore various constructions, representations, and uses of difference in educational contexts. These essays strive to bridge competing discourses of difference--for instance, feminist or anti-racist pedagogical models--to create a more inclusive education that adheres to principles of equity and social justice.

Deconstructing Privilege: teaching and learning as allies in the classroom

Although scholarly examinations of privilege have increased in recent decades, an emphasis on privilege studies pedagogy remains lacking within institutions. This edited collection explores best practices for effective teaching and learning about various forms of systemic group privilege such as that based on race, gender, sexuality, religion, and class. Formatted in three easy-to-follow sections, Deconstructing Privilege charts the history of privilege studies and provides intersectional approaches to the topic. Drawing on a wealth of research and real-life accounts, this book gives educators both the theoretical foundations they need to address issues of privilege in the classroom and practical ways to forge new paths for critical dialogues in educational settings. Combining interdisciplinary contributions from leading experts in the field-- such as Tim Wise and Abby Ferber-- with pedagogical strategies and tips for teaching about privilege, Deconstructing Privilege is an essential book for any educator who wants to address what privilege really means in the classroom.

Pedagogy of Hope

"With Pedagogy of Hope, Freire explores his best-known analytical themes - with even deeper understanding and a greater wisdom. Certainly, all of these themes have to be analyzed as elements of a body of critical, liberationist pedagogy. In the present book, we come to understand the author's pedagogical thinking even better, through the critical seriousness, humanistic objectivity, and engaged subjectivity which, in all of Freire's books, are always wedded to a unique creative innovativeness."

Reports

Online Resources