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ARTH 425 Roman Art: Home

The art and architecture of ancient Rome and its forebears, the Villanovans and Etruscans.

Welcome

This research guide will point you toward online research resources and strategies available to you as scholars doing research at Pepperdine. 

Roman scarcophagus

Muse sarcophagus (detail), Rome, 240-260 CE. Marble. Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, MO. 

ARTstor Images for Your Presentation

Portrait Bust of Hadrian as General.  c.130-138 A.D. Bronze. Musée du Louvre. Available from ARTstor.

The best place to find images for your presentation is the database, ARTstor.  Log on to ARTstor, create a personal account and create an image group.  Then view information on how to Export of Power Point


You can search ARTstor by the name of an art work, by geography, by classification (for example, architecture), or by collection (for example, Beyond the Taj).  Use the Advanced Search to limit by date.

Helpful videos on using ARTstor can be found on UTube

Getting Started

For background information, start with an exhaustive reference work such as  Grove Art Online or its predecessor in print, the Encyclopedia of World Art (N.Y.: McGraw-Hill, 1959-1983.  Ref. N 32 .E4833) - half of each volume consists of illustrative plates.  Both the 'Guided Tour' and 'Tips for Users' (available from the Home page) provide useful information on searching Grove/Oxford Art Online.

Bibliographies located in books or at the end of journal articles can be very helpful.  To learn if Pepperdine has access to a particular journal, search for the name of the journal in the library catalog, or use the 'Journals & Periodicals' search feature on the Library's Web site.

Finding Articles

Search these online databases to find articles on your topic/artist:

Specialized Online Encyclopedias

Subject Guide

Elizabeth Parang's picture
Elizabeth Parang
Contact:
Pepperdine University Libraries
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310-506-4046

Digital Roman Forum

From 1997 to 2003 the Cultural Virtual Reality Laboratory (CVRLab) created a digital model of the Roman Forum as it appeared in late antiquity. The notional date of the model is June 21, 400 A.D.

The purpose of the modeling project was to spatialize information and theories about how the Forum looked at this moment in time, which was more or less the height of its development as Rome's civic and cultural center. The digital model includes over twenty features (buildings and major monuments) filling up the western zone of the Roman Forum from the Temple of Vesta and Temple of Antoninus and Faustina on the east to the Tabularium facing the western slope of the Capitoline Hill.